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Hello, faithful subscribers! It’s been much too long!

Lots has happened since my last post–more writing, conferences, speaking gigs, and a podcast launch!–and I’d love to stay in touch with you via my other site, lindsayschlegel.com. I may occasionally post updates here in the future, but most of my big news will come through the main site.

Please click here to sign up for my email list (and get a free book club guide for my book, Don’t Forget to Say Thank You). You’ll also get access to notes on my talk on The Spirituality of Rejection if you sign up today!

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Thanks, and talk to you soon!

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Update and Heads Up

Update:

My book has officially launched into the world, and it’s as wonderful, strange, and delightful as I’d imagined!

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I’ve gotten only positive reviews (5 stars on Amazon!) and emails, telling me that the book touched my readers’ hearts, which is such a gift. I’ve also spent too much time with my phone in my face, scrutinizing stats and wondering which publicity is most effective to share my book with people who will want to read it. Some days are a roller coaster—this is great! could I do more? hooray!—but at the end of each one, I am so, so grateful that this dream has come true.

 

Don’t have your copy yet? Order it here in paperback or for Kindle.

 

Since the book launched, I’ve been on a number of radio shows, and I’m recording interviews on two podcasts over the next week. Something I didn’t expect was how many opportunities I’d have to talk with people who come at the book from different perspectives: fathers, grandmas, grandpas, Catholics, Protestants, “nones,” folks I know, and total strangers. The book says “CatholicMom.com” on the front of it, but it’s opened up a conversation that’s allowing connection and communion among a broader demographic. Very cool.

 

If you’re interested in listening in on my next appearance or want to tune into a recording of a past interview, check out my Events page, here, for links.

 

Heads Up:

On Wednesday I’m launching a giveaway on Instagram that I am so, so excited about. I’ve teamed up with a bunch of artists I truly admire and I can’t wait to share them. Follow me @lindsayschlegs for the details.

 

What’s next?

I have a couple of speaking gigs coming up, and I’m still working on writing projects large and small. Stay tuned on Facebook and Twitter to see what I’m up to.

 

Thank YOU for reading! God bless you!

 


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It’s Publication Month!

My book, Don’t Forget to Say Thank You: And Other Parenting Lessons That Brought Me Closer to God, will be published at the end of this month by Ave Maria Press. You can pre-order it now and expect it in your mailbox in just a few weeks!

In the meantime, I invite you to sign up for my email list, where you’ll get info on the book and other writing projects before it reaches the masses.

Sign up here!

Thanks so much! You’ll be hearing from me with a preview of the book soon!

 

I am a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.com. Some links on this site are affiliate links. If you make a purchase through an affiliate link, I will receive a percentage of the sale at no additional cost to you. Thank you!

Books About Books and Big News

I am a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.com. Some links on this site are affiliate links. If you make a purchase through an affiliate link, I will receive a percentage of the sale at no additional cost to you. Thank you!

—-

 

It has been just too dang long.

 

I have not forgotten about this space online, but I’ve been fortunate to have other writing projects over the last—eek, how long?—that have occupied my time and creative brain space. Including . . .

 

. . . my first book! Don’t Forget to Say Thank You: And Other Parenting Lessons That Brought Me Closer to God is scheduled for publication this fall by Ave Maria Press. It’s not a novel, but consider this: While I’d been working on my novel for over six years, this book took just over six months from the first time I opened a Word doc for it to getting a “yes” from an acquisitions meeting.

 

More on that to come (I just saw the cover and love it!), and in the meantime, a post I’ve been chewing on for some time. I’m sharing four of my favorite books about books—don’t be fooled by those that look like they’re for children!—and I hope to find some new gems you’ll leave in the comments.

 

The Fantastic Flying Books of Mr. Morris Lessmore by William Joyce

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Lyrical, lovely, and will make you want to live in a library (if you don’t already desire that!). The short film won an Academy Award.

 

The Night Bookmobile by Audrey Niffenegger (author of The Time Traveler’s Wife)51cYvfpa4SL._SY324_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg.

Another one I wish were real life. Released first serially in The Guardian, this story is a treat to read all in one sitting.

 

We Are in a Book by Mo Willems

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You can buy this for the next baby shower you go to, but after you read it, you’re going to want to keep it for yourself. Banana!

 

It’s a Book by Lane Smith

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If you’re giving this one to a kid, choose the board book version—the ending is a little more kid-friendly. In a world driven by technology, it’s good to remember the simple joys and tremendous value of a real book in your hands.

 

 

What are your favorite books about books?

Four Reasons Writers Need to Read This Book

Every so often I read I book that I end up recommending to everyone I encounter, regardless of state of life, occupation, or literary interests. This spring, thanks to my husband, I came across Originals: How Non-Conformists Move the World by Adam Grant, which falls swiftly into this category.

 

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I was first intrigued by Grant’s introductory TED talk, which inspired a piece I wrote for Verily on the merits of moderate procrastination. The book arrived from the library the day my piece was due. I was bummed not to have a chance to use it for the article, but once I began to dig in, I realized what I was learning was useful beyond a single article.

 

Grant argues that unconventional thought is not something you either have or don’t have. Rather, it’s something to which you can cultivate openness—once you discount common opinion on how brilliant minds and creative geniuses function.

 

Here’s why Originals appeals to writers (and humans in general).

 

  1. Moderate procrastination, as I mentioned above, is a tool, not a vice. Our first solution to a problem will usually be the most conventional. When we allow ourselves more time to consider the issue, the other experiences we encounter in the meantime can suggest connections we otherwise wouldn’t have made. Thus, a more creative final product. This is not license to wait until the last minute. Not having enough time to put a good idea into action renders it useless.

 

  1. Good ideas do not happen in a vacuum. Innovations that have changed culture are typically among heaps and heaps of failed ideas. Often the ones that take off are not what the creator expected to succeed. Basically, we can’t put all our eggs in one creative basket. Fear of failure can prevent the creation of what could be the next big thing. Translation for writers? Write, write, write. Submit, submit, submit.

 

  1. The writing is compelling. Research is used to present a focused narrative in a unique and engaging voice. If you normally write fiction, stretch your muscles with this. Broadening the scope of what you take in will deepen the resonance of what you produce.

 

  1. Grant proves that the best feedback you will get is from fellow creators. I’ve said it many times before, but a quality critique group is key to growing as a writer. You need to approach the craft from all sides—reading, writing, editing, discussing—to make progress. Accountability and encouragement don’t hurt the process, either.

 

I could go on, but this is a blog post, not a full-length manuscript. I recommend this book whole-heartedly! I’d love to hear what you think in the comments.